Cochrane in the news: June 2016

A round-up of selected recent media coverage citing, discussing, and presenting health evidence

A round-up of selected recent media coverage citing, discussing, and presenting health evidence - updated throughout the month

"Publication of reviews synthesizing child health evidence (PORSCHE): a survey of authors to identify factors associated with publication in Cochrane and non-Cochrane sources": article in the journal Systematic Reviews presents research by a team of Cochrane authors into decisions around preparation and publication of child-relevant systematic reviews.

"Cochrane continues to seek stable funding": an article in CMAJ discusses Cochrane Canada's current funding situation and prospects for the future.

"The importance of getting evidence into health service decision making": Cochrane Editor in Chief David Tovey writes on BMJ Blogs: "Evidence should be at the heart of health service decision making and where it is not, we should not be surprised when mistakes are made and resources used sub-optimally."

"Health journalism has a serious evidence problem. Here’s a plan to save it." Health journalist Julia Belluz writes for Vox on the problem of "headline whiplash [in] health news" and offers suggestions on how health journalists "need help making sense of research, and in turn, [need to help] readers (who include patients, policymakers, and doctors) to do the same."

"To control your weight, eat more — of the right foods": an article in the Washington Post discussing strategies for weight management cites recent Cochrane Review examining portion sizes and consumption, recommends monitoring portion sizes.

Prince’s Death a ‘Sign of the Times’”: a recent Huffington Post blog examining the dangers of opioid prescription and dependence cites Cochrane evidence indicating that “opioids are less effective at relieving acute pain than a combination of over-the-counter ibuprofen and acetaminophen”.

An interview with Ben Goldacre”: New Zealand blog community Public Address recently featured an interview with Ben Goldacre, where he discussed his role as a researcher and science communicator and how the medical community engages with the public: “In the 21st century, the fact is that society doesn’t run on trust and authority any more, it runs on evidence and open public discussion.”

Larger Wine Glasses May Lead People to Drink More, Study Shows”: a story in Nutrition Insight cites a recent Cochrane Review examining portion sizes and consumption, and describes new research into alcohol consumption and glass size.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016
Share/Save