Oral non steroid anti-inflammatories for children and adults with bronchiectasis

Infection and inflammation play an important role in the symptomatology and disease progression in patients with bronchiectasis. Anti inflammatory drugs may reduce the inflammatory cascade and thus may be beneficial in people with bronchiectasis. Using the standard search module of the Cochrane Airways Group, no randomised controlled trials that assessed the use of oral non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in bronchiectasis were found. Thus the routine use of NSAIDs in bronchiectasis cannot be recommended.

Authors' conclusions: 

There are no randomised controlled that examined the effect of oral NSAIDs in patients with bronchiectasis. In view of some benefit shown by inhaled NSAIDs in bronchiectasis, RCTs are clearly needed to study the beneficial effect of oral NSAIDs in patients with bronchiectasis.

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Background: 

Bronchiectasis is increasing recognised as a co-morbidity in many respiratory illness. Anti inflammatory drugs may reduce the inflammatory cascade and thus reduce symptoms and slow long term pulmonary decline.

Objectives: 

To assess the role of non steroid anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on symptom control and natural history of the disease in children and adults with bronchiectasis.

Search strategy: 

The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched by the Cochrane Airways Group up to December 2008.

Selection criteria: 

Only randomised controlled trials were considered. Patients with radiological or clinical evidence of bronchiectasis were included. Patients with Cystic Fibrosis were excluded.

Data collection and analysis: 

The titles, abstracts and citations were independently reviewed by two reviewers to assess potential relevance for full review. No eligible trials were identified and thus no data were available for analysis.

Main results: 

No randomised or controlled trials were found.

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