Indoor air modification interventions for prolonged non-specific cough in children

Prolonged, non-specific cough is common in childhood and is treated with a variety of therapies. There is a growing market for non-pharmacological treatments and these include air-modification modalities, (ionisers, vaporisers, humidifiers, air filters and regular vacuuming). No randomised controlled trials examining the efficacy of air-modulation modalities in the management of prolonged, non-specific cough in children were found. Therefore, based on the evidence currently available, a recommendation for these treatments cannot be given. Due to the popularity of air-modulation modalities, randomised controlled trials in this area are clearly needed.

Authors' conclusions: 

Based on the evidence currently available, a recommendation can not be given for air-modification interventions in the treatment of prolonged, non-specific cough in children.

Read the full abstract...
Background: 

Non-specific cough has been defined as non-productive cough in the absence of identifiable respiratory disease or known aetiology and is common in childhood. These children are treated with a variety of therapies, including non-pharmacological treatments. There is a wide variety and a growing market for these non-pharmacological treatments that include air-modification modalities.

Objectives: 

To determine the efficacy of air-modification modalities, (ionisers, vaporisers, humidifiers, air filters, regular vacuuming), in treating children with non-specific cough.

Search strategy: 

The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, OLDMEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched by the Cochrane Airways Group. The latest searches were performed in November 2008.

Selection criteria: 

All randomised controlled trials comparing air-modification modalities with a placebo treatment, for any duration.

Data collection and analysis: 

Results of searches were reviewed against pre-determined criteria for inclusion. Five papers were considered for inclusion but no eligible trials were identified and thus no data was available for analysis.

Main results: 

No randomised controlled trials that examined the efficacy of air-modification modalities in the management of prolonged, non-specific cough in children were found.

Share/Save